Riding the Moomin Train in Chiba (Video)

One of the most exciting ways to explore Japan is by rail. On the first installment of Railway Diaries, we ride Isumi Railway’s Moomin Train. Join me on a one-day trip to see Chiba’s gorgeous green fields and historic towns.

More info to follow on a separate post.

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Tsukuba Wanwan Land: A Chance to Pet 500 Dogs and Cats!

Basic Info

Tsukuba Wanwan Land
Location: 〒300-4353 Ibaraki Prefecture, Tsukuba, Numata 5-7-9 (https://goo.gl/maps/WguvrbDV77n)
Hours: 10 AM to 5 PM
Official Website (English, limited)
Admission:
Adult (ages 13 and up) – JPY 1500
Child (ages 3 to 12) – JPY 700
Senior (65 and above) – JPY 750
Infant (ages 0-2) – free
Access:
By Bus: From Tokyo Station, take the bus for Tsukuba Center (approx 70 mins). From Tsukuba Center, take the bus bound for Mt. Tsukuba and get off at Tsukubasanguchi Bus Stop. Tsukuba Wanwan Land is a 10-minute walk from here.
By Train: From Akihabara Station, take the Tsukuba Express to Tsukuba Station.From Tsukuba Center, take the bus bound for Mt. Tsukuba and get off at Tsukubasanguchi Bus Stop. Tsukuba Wanwan Land is a 10-minute walk from here.


Review

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One of the dog pens at Tsukuba Wanwan Land

One of the things I miss sorely about Manila is being in the constant company of dogs and cats. Living the single life in Tokyo doesn’t allow much room for pets, especially if you’re always out and about. Of course, if you live in one of the major cities in Japan, you can very well visit animal cafes to satisfy your need for a furry companion. But with limited hours, overpriced drinks and at times overcrowded shops,  I’d say heading out to the Tsukuba is a much better alternative. Continue reading

Jealousy in Japanese

Yakimochi – literally grilled rice cake. Why is this word used to refer to jealousy? This video explains a bit of the word’s etymology as well as how it is used.

Credits:

Bloom: An Ode to Cherry Blossoms

Tokyo Past 3’s YouTube channel is back, and it opens its 2017 run with a short piece on mortality and cherry blossoms, recited over shots of spring in the Kanto region.  Shogyō mujō (諸行無常) or “the temporality of all worldly things” happens to be one of my favorite themes, and more often than not I incorporate it in things I make. There’s only so much you can capture given the limits of time, erratic weather and a 9-to-5 job, but overall, I’m rather happy that I got to see them while they lasted.

BGM is “Koi to Komorebi no Toshishitsu” by Ryo Lion. Special thanks to Chihiro for looking over the piece for grammatical and spelling mistakes. He still thinks I cursed him because I sent him a birthday message in Tagalog.

Pintas & Christmas Nitpicking

In the Philippines, the culture of nitpicking is so prevalent that people feel entitled to comment on another person’s physical attributes all the time, most especially during the holiday season. I think we need to re-examine our attitude toward this. We all deserve to be happy, regardless of our physical make-up.